Saturday, January 30, 2016

Tangelo marmalade


It's citrus season, when some of my favorite fruits are in plentiful supply. All winter, I keep a basket filled with navel oranges and clementines or mandarins on my kitchen counter. They look pretty and they're an easy, good-for-you snack. I send them to school in the small Bears' lunchboxes and I've been know to toss a couple pieces in my bag before leaving the house myself. After the excesses of December (both dietary and monetary), it's nice to have a cheap, healthy and eminently portable food that still feels like a treat.


Last week, I saw some beautiful tangelos in the grocery store. They were very affordable too, and I immediately thought about making marmalade with them. I hadn't made marmalade in two years; the plum-apple jam I'd made the summer before last was so plentiful that I felt we should finish it all before I did much more preserving. We finished it by the middle of this past summer. The time for new marmalade had come.


Have you had a tangelo? It's an interesting fruit, a hybrid of a tangerine and a grapefruit. The skins are deep orange, like a tangerine, and the fruit itself is quite tart with a nice citrus tingle. You can definitely taste both "parent" fruits in a tangelo, and they can be very juicy. These tangelos were really ripe so they were especially full of juice.

Would you like to try making tangelo marmalade? I followed a basic marmalade recipe, ending up with five half-pints of delicious tangelo marmalade for my pantry.

You'll need:
3 lbs. tangelos (about 6 large fruits)
3 cups water
4 cups sugar
Pectin, if needed (I used one tablespoon of powdered low-sugar pectin)

Prepare jam jars, rings and lids. There are lots of ways to do this, but I like to heat and sterilize my jars on a pile of newspaper in a very low oven, 200 degrees. The lids and rings go in a saucepan of water on the stove; bring to a boil and let simmer until needed.



Wash the tangelos thoroughly. Halve the tangelos and extract the juice. Cut the peels into quarters and, using a sharp knife, slice the peels into very thin strips (I like long ribbons of peel in my marmalade but you can cut them as long or short as you like).


Place juice, peels, sugar and water in a large pot. You can use a slotted spoon now to remove any seeds. Bring the mixture to a full boil over high heat, then turn the heat down to simmer (I added the bit of powdered pectin at this point; I wasn't sure if I really needed it, but I've come to look at it as jam-making insurance). The mixture will need to cook for at least 30 minutes (mine took close to 60 minutes before it was ready for canning). Test the fruit mixture on a saucer chilled in the freezer; properly cooked jam will set quickly on the cold surface (another way to tell: if you drag a finger through the cooled blob of jam on the plate and the finger track remains, the jam is ready).


When the mixture is ready, ladle it into hot jars, leaving 1/4-inch head space and wiping rims with a wet paper towel. Quickly add hot lids and rings, screwing on until fingertip-tight. Process jars as desired (I follow USDA canning guidelines, adjusting for my location at high altitude). I filled and processed the four Kerr half-pint canning jars above, and partially filled a fifth jar, which I didn't process since we would be eating it right away. We ate it for lunch that day, while it was still a little warm, spread on sliced Italian bread. It was totally delicious. Cheerful too, the sweet-tart flavor and bright golden-orange color both very welcome in blustery, often-gray January.


"I got the blues thinking of the future, so I left off and made some marmalade. It's amazing how it cheers one up to shred oranges and scrub the floor." - D.H. Lawrence

40 comments:

  1. That looks so good, I'm tempted. The one time I tried to make marmalade I ended up with orange juice. i like your method of testing to see if it's set.

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  2. It looks wonderful. I've never preserved anything because of the sterilization part. But one of these days I am gonna try a quick jam to be eaten within a few days. :) Happy weekend!

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  3. So pinned! That looks amazing. I love a good marmelade on fresh baked bread. :-) Thank you for sharing!

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  4. I have had to lay off the preserving too. Bloke said not to put any more jars in the cupboard or it would come off the wall but I absolutely LOVE marmalade.

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  5. My mum used to check if it was set using the same method although she often left the plate in the freezer! This looks lovely but I have to admit I really do not like marmalade :(.

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  6. I've never even heard of tangelos, so I'm guessing they aren't available in the UK. I use Seville oranges to make marmalade and simply sterilise the clean jars and lids in a hot oven before filling them with marmalade. We don't use lids with rings for jam or marmalade in the UK.

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  7. Now that looks so good, but I don't think I've heard of Tangelos

    All the best Jan

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  8. Mmm. Looks good Jennifer. When I was in Israel in 1980 working on a kibbutz there was a lot of research going on about hybridising different citrus fruits and I'm wondering if your tangelo is the fruit of that research. The DH Lawrence quote made me smile as I have spent the best part of today on my hands and knees scrubbing the quarry tiles in the cottage. I wouldn't say the job is done but they are coming up beautifully. At cup of tea time we stood in the scrubbed kitchen drinking tea and eating marmalade cake and feeling very cheered up indeed.

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  9. I've never heard of tangelos before so not sure we have them over here in the UK. I'll keep a look out for them. While I've made jams and curds before, I'm yet to try any marmalade recipes, though I love it and yours looks particularly delicious.

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  10. I too have not heard of them! how beautiful!!! and that jam, so cheery and love that quotation. thank you.

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  11. Oh how yummy your tangelo marmalade looks. I have tried tangelo's but have not tried making marmalade with them. xx

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  12. Your marmalade looks lovely, Jennifer. :o)

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  13. What a fantastic quote. And the tangeloes sound delicious, I bet the marmalade is scrummy. I've never made marmalade, but I do like it, maybe I should give it a go. People don't tend to process or can things much over here, it always intrigues me, especially the adjustment for altitude. I'm guessing things boil at a lower temperature where you are. CJ xx

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    1. You're right, CJ. The boiling point is lower at high altitudes due to lower air pressure, which means things may take longer to cook, or sometimes we have to adjust ingredients, like adding flour to a packaged cake or brownie mix, or decreasing the water called for in a mix. I'm at approx. 5,500 feet where I live, and the boiling point is about 201-202 degrees here.

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  14. Beautiful photos :)
    BLOG M&MFASHIONBITES : http://mmfashionbites.blogspot.gr/
    Maria V.

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  15. You make the most unusual jams... It looks good and is so pretty!

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  16. I adore marmalade! Good for you to make that!! We went to my son's house for lasagna dinner and I got to see all the photographs on their iPad that they took in Phuket, Thailand when they went to a "destination" wedding a few weeks ago. ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

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  17. Sunshine in a jar! Your marmalade looks delicious. I've never heard of a tangelo before but would love to try one. We like to try fruit which we've never had before - I bought a pomolo last week and it sounds rather similar, a bit like a grapefruit but not quite. How fascinating that you have to adjust for altitude. Have a great week. xx

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  18. Yum! Your marmalade looks absolutely delicious. You're so creative in the kitchen and I'm always curious to see what you're going to make next. Thanks for sharing!
    Blessings, Betsy

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  19. This was a lovely piece of sun that shone from my screen this morning. I can't wait to start preserving again. I want to be more productive this year and fill my cupboards with home made jams, marmalades and chutneys. Have a wonderful Sunday x

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  20. That looks so delicious - some good advice from D.H.Lawrence who was born in the next county to where I was born. I'm going to take his other bit of advice and go scrub a floor - I know I will feel happier when I have done it - it's just a tiny room!!

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  21. I bet it tastes even better than it looks, probably smelled amazing too.
    Yum!
    Hugs,
    Meredith

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  22. I hadn't heard of tangelos before. I'm not a marmalade fan, but it does look lovely on the bread xx

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  23. Hi Jennifer! How wonderful! I'm bookmarking this post. You make it sound so easy!

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  24. Hi Jennifer! How wonderful! I'm bookmarking this post. You make it sound so easy!

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  25. I must try this recipe!! It looks so beautiful and delicious!! It has been so long since I had homemade…You have inspired with this one Jennifer! I hope you have a lovely week lady! Nicole xoxo

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  26. Good job Jennifer, looks delicious! I love mandarins, but I try not to eat sugar. Have a great week :)

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  27. I've never seen or tasted a tangelo before. Must keep an eye out next time we go to a big supermarket. Enjoy your new batch of marmalade - they look delicious!

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  28. What a sunny, delicious-looking marmalade. I'm interested in your method, which differs from mine in that you don't cook the fruit first to soften the skins. But I make mine with Seville oranges which may be much tougher-skinned than Tangelos (which I've not seen in the UK). And we don't process our jars after filling, we just pot into sterilised jars and that's it. Perhaps the US has more stringent guidelines than the UK. Fascinating that you have to adjust your timings, etc for altitude. Really interesting post, Jennifer, thank you. Have a good week. Sam x

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  29. I've never seen tangelo's but they sound an amazing combo!

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  30. not a big jam marmalade type person.. but it looks so pretty!

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  31. I've never even heard of tangelo's but that marmalade does look good. :) xx

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  32. I just bought myself a tangelo recently and enjoyed eating it...they are so pretty and cheery to look at, too. I also have been enjoying cuties and oranges and grapefruit lately. Thanks for detailing your marmalade making process, Jennifer. I am hankering to try to make lemon marmalade even though I have never tasted any, have you? xx

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    1. Hi Gracie, thank you. I've made marmalade with a mixture of oranges and lemons before but have never had any that was straight lemons. It sounds interesting. I hope you'll let us know how it is if you make any. :)

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  33. Oh yum, I bet that's delicious. I have been eating a lot of "cuties" and grapefruit this winter.

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  34. I have never had marmalade and so this looks so delicious and intriguing

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  35. I have never had marmalade and so this looks so delicious and intriguing

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  36. What a stunnin color. I'm drooling . I have never had a tangelo . Thank you for sharing the recipe.
    Jennifer loved your colour collabative post ,

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  37. I have never seen or tasted a tangelo. I wonder if you can get them in the UK? I will look out for them now. I love the way you keep the peel nice and thick in the marmalade. My family protest if I do that so I chop mine really finely in the food processor, but it looks better hand cut. I love all things citrussy (and you know I love to preserve!) so I think lemon or grapefruit marmalade is something I'll have to explore. xx

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  38. Mmm, I love marmalade, and home made is the absolute best! X

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